Tuesday, 19 April 2011

WTF?

As Good Friday draws nearer and our minds turn to the problem of suffering (or how many Easter eggs you are going to get, depending on your lights) you can forget all that pious stuff about the need to suffer in silence! According to a study at  swearing is good for you. The research involved people putting their hands into very hot water while swearing or refraining from swearing and the result was that the swearers coped better with pain - something to do with the bodies capacity to produce endorphins while swearing. But before the profane get too complacent, those in the study who didn't generally swear much derived a greater benefit from the expletives than those who swore as a matter of course.

So, now you know, like a glass of wine, swearing is good for you, but only in moderation.

7 comments:

  1. Good to know! Perhaps drinking the glass of wine while swearing provides double endorphins. I shall try it after Easter! :-)

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  2. This does not surprise me. Swearwords are kept in a separate part of our brains to ordinary language and we have to access them deliberately. I cannot believe we would have evolved a different compartment in our brains for profanities unless there was a very good reason for doing so.

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  3. Isn't that fascinating? I knew the minute I read this that it was true that swear words are kept in a separate part of our brains, I knew it was true for my own experience of using them.

    It must be because we are inhibited from using them and so, when we break the "inhibition" through our deliberate use, that creates euphoria and releases endorphins (or rather the other way round.) If you use profanities as a matter of course, I guess the synaptic pathways are more fully connected and so the endorphin effect is diminished.

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  4. Scientists working on this think that it is to do with having special words to use in situations where extreme emphasis is needed. The profanity of the words is merely accidental. A nice person might put "fiddlesticks" in their special drawer.

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  5. Madpriest, how did you know 'fiddlesticks' is my very own swearword?!

    I heard of one pastor whe used the names of members of his congregations as swearwords, with great emphasis. How tempting! Personally I find some place names do quite well. I'm particularly fond of 'Buglawton', as in 'Oh, Buglawton! and 'it's Buglawton shame that didn't work out' or 'that was a Buglawton awful PCC meeting!'. Sorry, those of you who live in Buglawton!

    'Oh Grinkle!' has possibilities for moments when the stress is a little less intense. And I feel a Chipping Sodbury coming on....

    Iffy Vicar

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  6. There's a hamlet near Cramlington in Northumberland called Boghouses. That has a nicely profane ring to it.

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  7. On the other hand you could always emulate Paul Whicker, the bad vicar from Viz.

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